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Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) studies ways to design physical spaces to reduce undesirable behavior and crime through focus on:

  1. A Physical Environment: This could be a building, a park, an office, a street, etc.
  2. Resulting Behavior of People: Some locations seem to inspire rowdy behavior; other locations encourage calmer behavior.
  3. Using Space More Effectively: How can the space be redesigned to encourage desirable behaviors and discourage undesirable behaviors?
  4. Crime/Loss Prevention: These tend to be byproducts of the redesign, rather than primary targets.

For more information, contact:

Kris Schendel
541-917-3215
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Positive

Negative

good1

The fencing defines the site, thereby controlling access to the property. It also allows for strong natural surveillance.

bad1

Trees with low limbs and tall shrubbery create hidden spaces. Trim trees up to 6 feet and shrubs down to 2 feet to create good visibility on a property.

good2

The managers of this convenience store maintain natural surveillance by keeping the windows clear of posters and ads.

bad2

A would-be criminal may see this store as an easy one to rob because ads in the windows almost completely obscure the view inside.

good3

A potential criminal is less likely to attempt a crime if he or she is at risk of being observed.

bad3

Little or no maintenance is taking place on this property, creating an image or sense that a person can do anything here and get away with it.

good4

A good example of Territorial Reinforcement through the use of lighting.

 

cpted elements