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Keeping good roads good

One of the most common concerns expressed by Albany residents is the condition of our streets. Albany streets are in a state of decline, but we're not alone. Aging infrastructure, not just streets, is a challenge for communities across the country. We've put together these pages to help residents and visitors learn about the condition of Albany streets, how they are maintained, and the challenge of keeping them in good shape while meeting community goals.

On average, Albany's streets are in "fair" condition. How do we keep our good roads in good condition while improving those that need to be completely rebuilt? It is more practical to keep good roads good than it is to let them completely deteriorate, but it can be hard to understand why money is being spent on a road that looks good when so many others around town are cracked, potholed and crumbling. The answer: it's the least expensive way to maintain a street.

Recognizing that our streets are deteriorating and that it is more cost effective to do periodic maintenance on good streets than it is to let them decline to the point of failure, the City Council initiated a City street evaluation effort to move towards preserving and improving the condition of our roads. While these are not new needs, or goals for our Council, a lot of effort has been spent recently to pursue change. Much of 2017, was spent evaluating the condition of Albany's streets, maintenance strategies, pavement management goals, and funding strategies that may need to be considered to meet those goals. These evaluations are ongoing.

Pavement represents the largest capital investment in the transportation system but is only a piece of the entire transportation system requiring attention. Street capacity, safety, bike and pedestrian enhancements, and improvements to help people with disabilities (i.e. curb ramps, sidewalks, etc) are also needed. Many of these needs are evaluated in long range planning documents, and are not adequately funding to meet community goals. All these categories of needed improvements demonstrate that the unfunded needs in the transportation system are much greater than those for pavement management alone. This website, however, will review only pavement management practices and community needs.

To learn more...

basics

Albany's Streets:
The Basics

good shape

Keeping Pavement in Good Shape and Why That's Important

3condition

Condition of Albany's Streets

4goals

Pavement Condition Goals & What That Costs

5funding

Potential Funding Alternatives

6qa

Q & A


7presentations

Past Presentations and Public Meetings

Albany residents who want to know what has been discussed related to transportation funding discussions at City Council and other public meetings can find it here. Details from the ongoing discussions are linked here. Information will be updated as it becomes available.

DateMemosPresentationsMinutes
July 11, 2016 (Local gas tax) Memo   Minutes
January 23, 2017 (Types of pavement failures, Pavement Condition Indexes, Pavement preservation techniques, and Least life cycle cost strategies)

Memo

Pavement Management 101 Whitepaper

Presentation Minutes
February 6, 2017 (Pavement Condition Assessment) Memo Presentation Minutes
March 20, 2017 (Street Funding Alternatives)

Memo

Presentation Minutes
May 8, 2017 (Local Fuel Tax Initiative Process) Memo   Minutes
July 24, 2017 (Mayor's Report on HB2017)     Minutes
November 8, 2017 (Street Funding Alternatives, Continued) Memo Presentation Minutes
November 29, 2017 (Street Funding Discussion)   Presentation Minutes